75 percent of Bay Area city workers collected over $100,000 in total compensation

Today, Transparent California released 2014 public employee compensation data — complete with names, pay, and benefits — for 395 cities and 44 counties statewide on TransparentCalifornia.com, the state’s largest public sector compensation database.

A survey of 93 Bay Area cities, accounting for 96 percent of the Bay Area population, reveals the average full-time city worker received $101,675 in pay and $142,467 in total compensation last year — with 44 percent paid at least $100,000 and 75 percent having received at least $100,000 in total compensation.

Highest statewide

The top five cities with the highest average full-time compensation packages statewide were all from the Bay Area:

  1. Corte Madera: $181,945
  2. Mountain View: $169,078
  3. El Cerrito: $167,534
  4. Fremont: $166,183
  5. Milpitas: $164,757

San Jose’s $160,713 average compensation package was seventh highest statewide, $65,373 of which was for benefits — the most expensive benefits package of any city statewide.

The Bay Area also led the state in total cost of employee compensation per resident, spending an average $1,261 per resident. San Francisco’s $4,483 cost was the highest statewide.

To view a table listing the average wages for all Bay Area cities, click here.

The three highest compensated Bay Area employees were:

  1. Retired Richmond fire chief Michael Banks cashed in unused leave to boost his total compensation package to $561,278.
  2. Vallejo police lieutenant Herman Robinson took home $532,542.
  3. Retired San Francisco deputy police chief David Shinn cashed in unused leave to boost his total compensation package to $510,733.

Taxpayers have been kept in the dark about the full cost of public employees, according to Transparent California’s research director Robert Fellner.

“Government workers receive tens of thousands of dollars worth of benefits that have no comparison in the private sector. This bloat enriches special interests at the expense of both cities and taxpayers.

“Simply publicizing base salaries is inadequate given that city workers enjoy leave policies and benefit packages that dwarf what most taxpayers receive. Reporting full compensation reveals a shocking inequity between city employees and the taxpayers who must bear the cost.”

Oakland

The City of Oakland’s personnel expenses grew by 13 percent last year, the largest increase of any Bay Area city surveyed. Oakland police officer Malcolm Miller’s $463,553 compensation package was the highest of any Oakland employee, with over $280,000 coming from OT and “other pay.”

Alarmingly, overtime pay appears to be heavily consolidated within a select few employees at a rate suggesting average work weeks of 80 hours for at least the past three years.

Officers Eric Karsseboom, Malcom Miller and Huy Nguyen averaged overtime pay that was 41, 62 and 89 percent greater than their approximately $100,000 base salaries over the past three years, respectively.

Fellner warned that, “The public should be concerned that working an average of 80 hours a week for years on end is a recipe for disaster, particularly given the life-or-death situations police officers routinely encounter.”

Regional averages

Average full-time municipal employee compensation for other regions in California was:

regional

Compensation is defined as total wages plus the employer cost of retirement and health benefits. Full-time employees are defined as those receiving a salary equal or greater to the “annual salary minimum” reported.

To view the entire dataset in a searchable and downloadable format, visit TransparentCalifornia.com.

To schedule an interview with Transparent California, please contact Robert Fellner at 559-462-0122 or Robert@TransparentCalifornia.com.

Transparent California is California’s largest and most comprehensive database of public sector compensation and is a project the Nevada Policy Research Institute, a nonpartisan, free-market think tank. Learn more at TransparentCalifornia.com.

Nearly half of San Joaquin Valley city workers collected over $100,000 in total compensation

Today, Transparent California released previously-unseen 2014 public employee compensation data — complete with names, pay, and benefits — for 395 cities and 44 counties statewide on TransparentCalifornia.com, the state’s largest public sector compensation database.

A survey of 55 San Joaquin Valley cities, accounting for 93 percent of the San Joaquin Valley population, reveals that the average full-time city worker received $104,475 in total compensation last year, with 46 percent collecting at least $100,000.

The five highest compensated city workers in the San Joaquin Valley were:

  1. Bakersfield city manager Alan Tandy: $359,879
  2. Tracy fire chief Alford Nero: $355,865
  3. Bakersfield police chief Greg Williamson: $323,487
  4. Fresno city manager Bruce Rudd: $322,085
  5. Stockton city manager Kurt Wilson: $308,640

The top six San Joaquin Valley cities with the highest average compensation package for full-time employees were:

  1. Tracy $135,134
  2. Paso Robles: $129,081
  3. San Luis Obispo: $128,463
  4. Manteca: $128,150
  5. Atwater: $125,773
  6. Lodi: $124,602

To view a table listing the average wages of all San Joaquin Valley cities, click here.

The average compensation for full-time employees of the largest departments at the cities of Fresno, Modesto and Stockton was:

Average full-time compensation by department

Taxpayers have been kept in the dark about the full cost of public employees, according to Transparent California’s research director Robert Fellner.

“Government workers receive tens of thousands of dollars worth of benefits that have no comparison in the private sector. This bloat enriches special interests at the expense of both cities and taxpayers.

“Simply publicizing base salaries is inadequate given that city workers enjoy leave policies and benefit packages that dwarf what most taxpayers receive. Reporting full compensation reveals a shocking inequity between city employees and the taxpayers who must bear the cost.”

Overtime and other pay boosts earnings

For all San Joaquin Valley cities surveyed, overtime and other pay combined amounted to 17 percent of salary, slightly lower than the statewide average of 19 percent.

Combined overtime and other pay at Bakersfield equaled 23 percent of salary, the highest of any San Joaquin Valley city with a population of at least 30,000.

Statewide

Average full-time municipal employee compensation for other regions in California was:

Compensation is defined as total wages plus the employer cost of retirement and health benefits. Full-time employees are defined as those receiving a salary equal or greater to the “annual salary minimum” reported.

To view the entire dataset in a searchable and downloadable format, visit TransparentCalifornia.com.

For more information or to schedule an interview with Transparent California, please contact Robert Fellner at 559-462-0122 or Robert@TransparentCalifornia.com.

Transparent California is California’s largest and most comprehensive database of public sector compensation and is a project the Nevada Policy Research Institute, a nonpartisan, free-market think tank. Learn more at TransparentCalifornia.com.

Over half of Inland Empire city workers collected at least $100,000 in total compensation

Today, Transparent California released previously-unseen 2014 public employee compensation data — complete with names, pay, and benefits — for 395 cities and 44 counties statewide on TransparentCalifornia.com, the state’s largest public sector compensation database.

A survey of 44 Inland Empire cities, accounting for 93 percent of the Inland Empire population, reveals that the average full-time city worker received $123,663 in total compensation last year. Over a third received at least $100,000 in pay alone.

The three highest compensated city workers in the Inland Empire were:

  1. Retired Rancho Cucamonga fire Chief Michael Bell cashed in unused leave to boost his total compensation to $446,867.
  2. Corona fire captain Roger Williams collected more than double his salary in OT to receive a total of $438,448.
  3. Fontana City manager Kenneth Hunt earned $423,567.

The top five Inland Empire cities with the highest average compensation package for full-time employees were:

  1. Corona: $153,683
  2. Murrieta: $153,646
  3. Palm Desert: $143,486
  4. Rialto: $138,711
  5. Cathedral City: $138,263

The average 2014 compensation package for full-time employees of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties was $86,942 and $96,186, respectively.

To view a table listing the average wages of all Inland Empire cities, click here.

Taxpayers have been kept in the dark about the full cost of public employees, according to Transparent California’s research director Robert Fellner.

“Government workers receive tens of thousands of dollars worth of benefits that have no comparison in the private sector. This bloat enriches special interests at the expense of both cities and taxpayers.

“Simply publicizing base salaries is inadequate given that city workers enjoy leave policies and benefit packages that dwarf what most taxpayers receive. Reporting full compensation reveals a shocking inequity between city employees and the taxpayers who must bear the cost.”

Overtime and other pay boosts earnings

The combined overtime and other pay at all Inland Empire cities surveyed was worth 24 percent of regular pay, as compared to the statewide average of 19 percent.

Rialto’s combined overtime and other pay amounted to 49 percent of salary — the highest of any city statewide. Corona and Ontario were in the top 10 statewide, with overtime and other pay spending at 39 and 38 percent of salary, respectively.

In Corona, the average full-time firefighter received $61,191 in overtime pay, representing a 73 percent increase to their regular salary. Captain Williams more than tripled his $106,000 salary by collecting nearly $233,000 in overtime. 20 percent of Corona firefighters received overtime pay worth more than their regular salary.

Statewide

Average full-time municipal employee compensation for other regions in California was:

Compensation is defined as total wages plus the employer cost of retirement and health benefits. Full-time employees are defined as those receiving a salary equal or greater to the “annual salary minimum” reported.

To view the entire dataset in a searchable and downloadable format, visit TransparentCalifornia.com.

For more information or to schedule an interview with Transparent California, please contact Robert Fellner at 559-462-0122 or Robert@TransparentCalifornia.com.

Transparent California is California’s largest and most comprehensive database of public sector compensation and is a project the Nevada Policy Research Institute, a nonpartisan, free-market think tank. Learn more at TransparentCalifornia.com.

60 percent of San Diego-area city workers collected over $100,000 in total compensation

Today, Transparent California released previously-unseen 2014 public employee compensation data – complete with names, pay, and benefits – for 395 cities and 44 counties statewide on TransparentCalifornia.com, the state’s largest public sector compensation database.

The average full-time city worker for all 17 cities in San Diego County, excluding the City of San Diego, received $121,543 in total compensation, with 60 percent having received $100,000 or more. The average wage was $88,888, with 35 percent paid at least $100,000.

The three San Diego cities with the highest average compensation package for full-time, year-round employees were:

  1. San Marcos: $147,762
  2. Santee City: $143,917
  3. Chula Vista: $134,557

To view a table of the average wages for all San Diego County cities, click here.

Taxpayers have been kept in the dark about the full cost of public employees, according to Transparent California’s research director Robert Fellner.

“Government workers receive tens of thousands of dollars worth of benefits that have no comparison in the private sector. This bloat enriches special interests at the expense of both cities and taxpayers.

“Simply publicizing base salaries is inadequate given that city workers enjoy leave policies and benefit packages that dwarf what most taxpayers receive. Reporting full compensation reveals a shocking inequity between city employees and the taxpayers who must bear the cost.”

City of San Diego

The average full-time San Diego worker received $74,767 in wages. San Diego did not provide the cost of retirement benefits on an employee level; however the San Diego City Employees’ Retirement System reported an average contribution rate of 60 percent for the 2014 fiscal year, suggesting an average cost of nearly $40,000 per member.

“The failure of public pension plans is on full display at the City of San Diego, where retirement costs are a staggering 20 times greater than what that the median private employer pays,” according to Fellner.

The three highest compensated employees in San Diego were:

  1. Escondido attorney Jeffrey Epp: $507,409.
  2. Escondido manager Clayton Phillips: $490,699.
  3. San Diego County chief administrative officer Helen Robbins-Meyer: $419,302

Epp and Phillps each increased their total compensation by over $100,000 by converting unused leave into cash, according to city officials.

Overtime and other pay boosts earnings

The combined overtime and other pay at all San Diego cities was worth 22 percent of regular pay, as compared to the statewide average of 19 percent.

San Marcos, El Cajon and San Diego’s total overtime and other pay was the highest of any city in San Diego County at 27, 26 and 24 percent of regular pay, respectively.

San Marcos city workers’ pay more than double that of residents

San Diego city workers’ earnings soar above those of city residents, just-released data from the U.S. Census Bureau reveals.

The median full-time, year-round San Marcos city worker earned $107,656 — more than double the $43,583 median earnings of city residents.

This information for all cities in San Diego County is here.

Statewide

Average full-time municipal employee compensation for other regions in California was:

regional

Compensation is defined as total wages plus the employer cost of retirement and health benefits. Full-time employees are defined as those receiving a salary equal or greater to the “annual salary minimum” reported.

To view the entire dataset in a searchable and downloadable format, visit TransparentCalifornia.com.

To schedule an interview with Transparent California, please contact Robert Fellner at 559-462-0122 or Robert@TransparentCalifornia.com.

Transparent California is California’s largest and most comprehensive database of public sector compensation and is a project the Nevada Policy Research Institute, a nonpartisan, free-market think tank. Learn more at TransparentCalifornia.com.

Two-thirds of Orange County city workers collected over $100,000 in total compensation

Today, Transparent California released previously-unseen 2014 public employee compensation data — complete with names, pay, and benefits — for 395 cities and 44 counties statewide on TransparentCalifornia.com, the state’s largest public sector compensation database.

A survey of 28 cities in Orange County, accounting for 84 percent of the region’s population, revealed that the average full-time city worker received $135,464 in total compensation last year, with 66 percent receiving $100,000 or more. The average total earnings was $98,958, with 43 percent paid at least $100,000.

The three Orange County cities with the highest average compensation package for full-time, year round employees were:

  1. Costa Mesa: $155,921
  2. Newport Beach: $152,331
  3. Anaheim: $149,494

2014 data for Huntington Beach and Orange City was not available at press time, but should be available in the near future.

To view a table listing the average wages and total employee cost per resident for all cities in Orange County, click here.

The three highest compensated City or County employees in Orange County were:

  1. Santa Ana City manager David Cavazos: $434,106.
  2. San Clemente City manager Pall Gudgeirsson: $427,689.
  3. Orange County executive officer Michael Giancola: $411,032.

Taxpayers have been kept in the dark about the full cost of public employees, according to Transparent California’s research director Robert Fellner.

“Government workers receive tens of thousands of dollars worth of benefits that have no comparison in the private sector. This bloat enriches special interests at the expense of both cities and taxpayers.

“Simply publicizing base salaries is inadequate given that city workers enjoy leave policies and benefit packages that dwarf what most taxpayers receive. Reporting full compensation reveals a shocking inequity between city employees and the taxpayers who must bear the cost.”

Overtime and other pay boosts earnings

The combined overtime and other pay at all Orange County cities surveyed was worth 20.5 percent of regular pay, as compared to the statewide average of 19 percent.

Westminster, Costa Mesa and Newport Beach’s total overtime and other pay was the highest of any Orange County city at 32, 30 and 27 percent of regular pay, respectively.

Cost per resident

The cities of Newport Beach and Brea spent more on employee compensation per resident than any other Orange County city at $1,285 and $986, respectively.

Newport Beach’s cost was the 18th highest of any city with a population of at least 10,000 statewide — and nearly triple the county average of $472.

Santa Ana city workers’ pay triple that of residents

Just-released income data from the U.S. Census Bureau reveals shocking levels of income inequality between Orange County taxpayers and city workers. The median earnings of full-time, year round Santa Ana city workers was $90,313, more than triple the $28,626 median earnings of city residents.

This information for all Orange County cities is here.

Statewide

Average full-time municipal employee compensation for other regions in California was:

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Compensation is defined as total wages plus the employer cost of retirement and health benefits. Full-time employees are defined as those receiving a salary equal or greater to the “annual salary minimum” reported.

To view the entire dataset in a searchable and downloadable format, visit TransparentCalifornia.com.

To schedule an interview with Transparent California, please contact Robert Fellner at 559-462-0122 or Robert@TransparentCalifornia.com.

Transparent California is California’s largest and most comprehensive database of public sector compensation and is a project the Nevada Policy Research Institute, a nonpartisan, free-market think tank. Learn more at TransparentCalifornia.com.

59 percent of Sacramento Valley city workers collected over $100,000 in total compensation

Today, Transparent California released previously-unseen 2014 public employee compensation data — complete with names, pay, and benefits — for 395 cities and 44 counties statewide on TransparentCalifornia.com, the state’s largest public sector compensation database.

A survey of 30 Sacramento Valley cities, accounting for 94 percent of the region’s population, reveals that the average full-time city worker received $118,652 in total compensation last year, with nearly 59 percent having received at least $100,000.

The top three Sacramento Valley cities with the highest average compensation package for full-time, year round employees were:

  1. Folsom: $137,565
  2. Chico: $137,380
  3. Elk Grove: $136,673

Full-time Sacramento City and County workers took home an average of $108,351 and $106,941, respectively.

To view a table listing the average wages and total employee cost per resident for all cities in the Sacramento Valley, click here.

Top earners

Former Lincoln City manager James Estep cashed in over $300,000 in unused leave to boost his total 2014 compensation to $512,370, making him the top earner of the Sacramento Valley.

The four highest compensated Sacramento Valley city workers were:

  1. Lincoln City manager James Estep: $512,370
  2. Roseville City attorney Brita Bayless: $374,618.
  3. Roseville City manager Raymond Kerridge: $365,799.
  4. Citrus Heights City manager Henry Tingle: $361,899.

The three highest compensated Sacramento County workers were:

  1. Departed assistant chief deputy district attorney Marvin Stern cashed in unused leave to boost his compensation to: $410,038.
  2. Departed sheriff captain James Cooper cashed in unused leave to boost his compensation to: $391,790.
  3. County executive officer Bradley Hudson collected: $389,551.

Taxpayers have been kept in the dark about the true cost of public employees, according to Transparent California’s research director Robert Fellner.

“Government workers receive tens of thousands of dollars worth of benefits that have no comparison in the private sector. This bloat enriches special interests at the expense of both cities and taxpayers.

“Simply publicizing base salaries is inadequate given that city workers enjoy leave policies and benefit packages that dwarf what most taxpayers receive. Reporting full compensation reveals a shocking inequity between city employees and the taxpayers who must bear the cost.”

Overtime and other pay boosts earnings

The combined overtime and other pay at all Sacramento Valley cities surveyed was worth 16 percent of regular pay, as compared to the statewide average of 19 percent.

Rancho Cordova, Folsom and Elk Grove’s total overtime and other pay was the highest of any Sacramento Valley city at 30, 27 and 26 percent of regular pay, respectively.

Cost per resident

The cities of Roseville and Redding spent more on employee compensation per resident than any other Sacramento Valley city at $1,194 and $949, respectively.

Roseville’s cost was the 22nd highest of any city with a population of at least 10,000 statewide — and more than twice the Sacramento Valley regional average of $606.

City workers’ pay dwarfs taxpayers

Just-released income data from the U.S. Census Bureau reveals shocking levels of income inequality between Sacramento Valley taxpayers and city workers. The median earnings of full-time, year-round Sacramento city workers was $77,665 — 72 percent more than the $45,115 median earnings of city residents.

City workers at Chico, Citrus Heights and Yuba City had median earnings nearly double that of taxpayers.

This information for all Sacramento Valley cities is here.

Statewide

Average full-time municipal employee compensation for other regions in California was:

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Compensation is defined as total wages plus the employer cost of retirement and health benefits. Full-time employees are defined as those receiving a salary equal or greater to the “annual salary minimum” reported.

To view the entire dataset in a searchable and downloadable format, visit TransparentCalifornia.com.

To schedule an interview with Transparent California, please contact Robert Fellner at 559-462-0122 or Robert@TransparentCalifornia.com.

Transparent California is California’s largest and most comprehensive database of public sector compensation and is a project the Nevada Policy Research Institute, a nonpartisan, free-market think tank. Learn more at TransparentCalifornia.com.

Nearly 60% of Los Angeles-area city workers collected at least $100,000 in total compensation

Today, Transparent California released previously-unseen 2014 public employee compensation data — complete with names, pay, and benefits — for 395 cities and 44 counties statewide on TransparentCalifornia.com, the state’s largest public sector compensation database.

A survey of 69 cities in Los Angeles County, excluding the City of Los Angeles, reveals that the average full-time city worker received $129,194 in total compensation, with 59 percent receiving at least $100,000.

The four highest compensated city workers in Los Angeles County were:

  1. Santa Monica city manager Rodney Gould: $496,819
  2. Los Angeles Harbor chief port pilot II Bent Christiansen: $489,191, retirement benefits not included
  3. Los Angeles Harbor chief port pilot II Michael Rubino: $474,535, retirement benefits not included
  4. Beverly Hills city manager Jeff Kolin: $466,540

City of Los Angeles

Los Angeles did not provide retirement costs per employee. The average full-time city worker received $101,487 in wages, with 47 percent collecting at least $100,000. The average full-time Department of Water and Power worker received $118,115 in wages, with 64 percent collecting at least $100,000.

The top 5 City departments with the highest pay for full-time employees were:

  1. Fire: $156,651
  2. City Attorney: $124,598
  3. City Administrative Officer: $115,249
  4. Information Technology Agency: $107,065
  5. Police: $104,598

Taxpayers have been kept in the dark about the full cost of public employees, according to Transparent California’s research director Robert Fellner.

“Government workers receive tens of thousands of dollars worth of benefits that have no comparison in the private sector. This bloat enriches special interests at the expense of both cities and taxpayers.

“Simply publicizing base salaries is inadequate given that city workers enjoy leave policies and benefit packages that dwarf what most taxpayers receive. Reporting full compensation reveals a shocking inequity between city employees and the taxpayers who must bear the cost.”

The top five cities in Los Angeles County with the highest average compensation package for full-time employees were:

  1. West Hollywood: $148,858
  2. San Gabriel: $145,400
  3. Santa Monica: $144,780
  4. Downey: $141,702
  5. Inglewood: $139,381

Full-time Los Angeles County workers took home an average of $113,104 in total compensation.

Overtime and other pay boosts earnings

For all Los Angeles cities surveyed, overtime and other pay combined amounted to 22 percent of regular salary, slightly higher than the statewide average of 19 percent.

Torrance’s total overtime and other pay was worth 40 percent of regular pay — the highest of any Los Angeles city and third highest statewide. Overtime and other pay increased the average, full-time Torrance firefighter or fire captain’s regular pay by 123 percent.

Cost per resident

The cities of Beverly Hills and Santa Monica had the second and third highest cost of employee compensation per resident statewide at $3,242 and $2,914, respectively.

The cost per resident for the City of Los Angeles, including the Department of Water and Power, was estimated at $1,694 by utilizing aggregate retirement costs for the 2014 fiscal year provided by the Controller’s Office.

The average cost per resident for all Los Angeles cities surveyed was $1,203.

City workers’ pay double that of residents

The earnings of Los Angeles city workers soar above those of city residents, just-released data from the U.S. Census Bureau reveals.

The median full-time, year-round Los Angeles city worker earned $97,876  — more than double the $39,096 median earnings of city residents.

This information for all Los Angeles cities is here.

Statewide

Average full-time municipal employee compensation for other regions in California was:

regCVfix

Compensation is defined as total wages plus the employer cost of retirement and health benefits. Full-time employees are defined as those receiving a salary equal or greater to the “annual salary minimum” reported.

To view the entire dataset in a searchable and downloadable format, visit TransparentCalifornia.com.

To schedule an interview with Transparent California, please contact Robert Fellner at 559-462-0122 or Robert@TransparentCalifornia.com.

Transparent California is California’s largest and most comprehensive database of public sector compensation and is a project the Nevada Policy Research Institute, a nonpartisan, free-market think tank. Learn more at TransparentCalifornia.com.